How to Photograph the NORTHERN LIGHTS! Basic to Advanced



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Shooting the northern lights – aka the aurora borealis photography – doesn’t have to be difficult. However, you have to know your camera pretty well, and you have to have had some practice with taking night photographs. If you can master those things, then all you need are a few extra pointers to get that perfect northern lights photograph.

A big thanks to those that support our work via Patreon, especially, Morgan Price, Jinyuan Yeong, James Brady, Please Stand By and Larry Nelson.

Be sure to check out Mike’s Channel too:

If you want 52 Things to start on right now to improve your filmmaking and photography – we have videos on them all here:

Our GEAR ————
Main DSLR :
Second Camera :
Main Lens –
The Adventure Camera Bag :
The Macro Lens –
Telephoto Lens –
Our Mega Wide Lens –
Our BEST On-camera Mic –
The Drone –
My Moving Timelapse setup –
GoPro HERO 7 –
Our Filmmaking Book!!! –
Our Music:
The full video setup:
(By buying through these links you help us support the channel)

On Social ————–
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Twitter:
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Jonas and I are creating a whole series of how-to-filmmaking videos to get you started. Here is the first video: and our book:

My main science YouTube Channel:

Help us create amazing, world reaching content by translating and transcribing videos on our channel:

Steel Wool Photography Basics



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A big thanks to all current and future patrons who are helping fund this science and filmmaking outreach via Patreon:

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This video is all about steel wool photography. You will need the following:

Steel Wool: Pick 0, 00, 000, or 0000 grade:
A kitchen wisk set:
a wire rope to spin it:
9 volt battery:

I added these amazon links in case you want to buy the needed materials. They are affiliate links, so if you buy them through the link, it will help us out. Good luck with your photography

The 9-volt battery is used to ignite the steel wool. Essentially it sends a current through the thin wire and it heats up a lot … to about 700 degrees C. These temperatures cause the iron to react with oxygen in the air creating iron oxide. This reaction releases heat, which heats up the next strand and so on, causing a cascading reaction across the steel wool. When you’re doing this remember the science. The chemical reaction requires oxygen. So, fluffing it up and then spinning it, increases the amount of oxygen available, hence speeding up the reaction and giving us the amazing display that we used for our photographs…

Now to warn you about the hazards. Be very careful with this. You are dealing very hot things and spreading them over a considerable distance. Try to always do it over water or concrete as they will catch things on fire, even when you’re trying to be careful.

And of course, they can also burn you.

Alright everyone, send us your pics, be responsible and stay safe! I’m not responsible for any forest fires… 🙂

If you want 52 Things to start on right now to improve your filmmaking and photography – we have videos on them all here:

Our GEAR ————
Main DSLR :
Second Camera :
Main Lens –
The Adventure Camera Bag :
The Macro Lens –
Telephoto Lens –
Our Mega Wide Lens –
Our BEST On-camera Mic –
The Drone –
My Moving Timelapse setup –
GoPro HERO 7 –
Our Filmmaking Book!!! –
Our Music:
The full video setup:
(By buying through these links you help us support the channel)

On Social ————–
Instagram: (Jonas @behindthescience)
Twitter:
Facebook:
Website:
YouTube: (for most of my work)

Jonas and I are creating a whole series of how-to-filmmaking videos to get you started. Here is the first video: and our book:

My main science YouTube Channel:

Help us create amazing, world reaching content by translating and transcribing videos on our channel:

Macro-Photography Lens and Kit (w/ Phil Torres)



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A big thanks to all current and future patrons who are helping fund this science and filmmaking outreach via Patreon:

Don’t forget to follow me on Instagram:

Today I’m testing out a new macro lens setup via a conversation I had with Phil Torres. He gave me some ideas, and then I got the kit, and flew to Panama to test it out in the rainforest.

Here is a list of macro equipment I discussed int he video in order of appearance.

Canon 50mm:
GoPro Hack:
Canon 65mm:
Macro Flash from Phil:
Canon 100mm L:
Yongnuo Flash Kit:
Litratorch cubes:
Canon 1DX MII:
Speedlight transmiter:
Speedlight Flash:
Flexible light stand:

Phil Torres on Instagram:
MacrointheWild on Instagram:

Haley on Instagram:

Special thanks to the Smithsonian for letting me come down to Barro Colorado Island.

If you want 52 Things to start on right now to improve your filmmaking and photography – we have videos on them all here:

Our GEAR ————
Main DSLR :
Second Camera :
Main Lens –
The Adventure Camera Bag :
The Macro Lens –
Telephoto Lens –
Our Mega Wide Lens –
Our BEST On-camera Mic –
The Drone –
My Moving Timelapse setup –
GoPro HERO 7 –
Our Filmmaking Book!!! –
Our Music:
The full video setup:
(By buying through these links you help us support the channel)

On Social ————–
Instagram: (Jonas @behindthescience)
Twitter:
Facebook:
Website:
YouTube: (for most of my work)

Jonas and I are creating a whole series of how-to-filmmaking videos to get you started. Here is the first video: and our book:

My main science YouTube Channel:

Help us create amazing, world reaching content by translating and transcribing videos on our channel:

Milky Way Photography: Lightroom Tutorial – Basic Workflow



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A big thanks to all current and future patrons who are helping fund this science and filmmaking outreach via Patreon:

Don’t forget to follow me on Instagram:

This week I’m showing you my basic Lightroom workflow with a few photographs submitted by some of you. In particular I will do some astrophotography. I also got a lot of shots from a ton of you, including BackBurner, David Mikic, Francesco Paggiaro, Fraser Harrison, Rob Nelson, Lasse Grotwinkel, Marc Frederiksen, Shannon Hill, Jessie Jim, and Simon Patterson. Big thanks to all of you. I will be using more of these, so stay tuned. You are helping the entire community.

The shot I pulled was (ironically) from what appears to be my Canadian doppelganger, Rob Nelson. He is a photographer up north who is also and ecologist/geologist. He had some amazing night photography that he submitted. I thought I’d pull one of his to show the basic process you might use to pull out the milky way in a photo. Learn more about Rob’s photography at: and follow him on IG and Twitter – @robnelson4

When shooting the milky way, there are a few things to think about. First, you want to get as much of the milky way exposed as possible without blurring the stars. This a little bit depends on your lens. Many fotographers use the 500 rule to determine their shutter speed. You divide your lens into 500. So, if you had a 50mm lens (500/50), you couldn’t expose longer than 10 seconds. If you had a 25mm lens, you could expose for 20 seconds – etc. In this case, Rob had a 16mm lens with a shutter speed of 15 seconds. I think he could have even exposed longer, which may have given a better histogram. However, with the people in the shot, you risk them blurring as they stand their. The truth is, there is a lot to work with in this photo.

A lot of photo manipulation is personal preference. Keep in mind that I’m doing a lot of manipulation based on my preferences. For much of what I do, I like the surreal look. I often add vibrant colors that may look unnatural to what you had in the environment. I’m not a purist. However, the few things that you have to keep in mind are:

1. Don’t over-do the grain. It will look bad.
2. Milky Way shots are best if your eye is drawn to it.
3. Always remember your distribution. If you’re making photos for a giant wall, work hard to eliminate any noise.

I have more I’d love to share if you’re interested. Leave your comments below on how your workflow is different. Feel free to give me tips. That not only helps me, but it helps the entire community.

Make sure to watch Jonas’ retouching video in a future episode…

If you want 52 Things to start on right now to improve your filmmaking and photography – we have videos on them all here:

Our GEAR ————
Main DSLR :
Second Camera :
Main Lens –
The Adventure Camera Bag :
The Macro Lens –
Telephoto Lens –
Our Mega Wide Lens –
Our BEST On-camera Mic –
The Drone –
My Moving Timelapse setup –
GoPro HERO 7 –
Our Filmmaking Book!!! –
Our Music:
The full video setup:
(By buying through these links you help us support the channel)

On Social ————–
Instagram: (Jonas @behindthescience)
Twitter:
Facebook:
Website:
YouTube: (for most of my work)

Jonas and I are creating a whole series of how-to-filmmaking videos to get you started. Here is the first video: and our book:

My main science YouTube Channel:

Help us create amazing, world reaching content by translating and transcribing videos on our channel:

The World’s Most Powerful Macro Photography – Explained



Views:4478|Rating:4.77|View Time:8:34Minutes|Likes:210|Dislikes:10
A big thanks to all current and future patrons who are helping fund this science and filmmaking outreach via Patreon:

Don’t forget to follow me on Instagram:

This week we went to the Forest Entomology Lab at the University of Florida to take a peak into the world of EXTREME MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY! And while these researchers are taking the macro shots of these insects to the extreme, this technique is actually something that anyone can try for less than 50 dollars. While we may show a beginner setup in the future, this was a really fun setup to talk about and showcase. I hope you enjoy seeing this technique. I know we had fun working with them to show it!

Remember, we do these each week as an outreach to help other filmmakers and photographers learn these techniques. They’re usually a side project to our main films.

In particular, special thanks to our Patreon supporters: Tobias Haase, Medesthai,, Huw James, Larry Nelson, Please Stand By, James Brady, Morgan Price, Jinyuan Yeong, George Logue, Chasing the Son Mobile Media, Johanna van de Woestijne, and all the others that help fund our work.

If you want 52 Things to start on right now to improve your filmmaking and photography – we have videos on them all here:

Our GEAR ————
Main DSLR :
Second Camera :
Main Lens –
The Adventure Camera Bag :
The Macro Lens –
Telephoto Lens –
Our Mega Wide Lens –
Our BEST On-camera Mic –
The Drone –
My Moving Timelapse setup –
GoPro HERO 7 –
Our Filmmaking Book!!! –
Our Music:
The full video setup:
(By buying through these links you help us support the channel)

On Social ————–
Instagram: (Jonas @behindthescience)
Twitter:
Facebook:
Website:
YouTube: (for most of my work)

Jonas and I are creating a whole series of how-to-filmmaking videos to get you started. Here is the first video: and our book:

My main science YouTube Channel:

Help us create amazing, world reaching content by translating and transcribing videos on our channel:

Smoke Grenade Photography: Tips and Tricks



Views:18687|Rating:4.96|View Time:7:26Minutes|Likes:496|Dislikes:4
A big thanks to all current and future patrons who are helping fund this science and filmmaking outreach via Patreon:

Don’t forget to follow me on Instagram:

Here is a how-to guide to smoke grenade or smoke bomb photography. Mostly we wanted to test out what worked and what didn’t so that we could translate that into a step by step guide. I think we have a handful of things here that will save you time and keep you safer on your first attempt. For a more detailed guide including more behind the scenes video, go to the article I wrote here:

In particular, special thanks to our Patreon supporters: Tobias Haase, Medesthai, Larry Nelson, Please Stand By, James Brady, Morgan Price, Jinyuan Yeong, George Logue and all the others that help fund our work.

Serge Skiba can be found at www.earthcaptured.com or @earthcaptured on instagram

Mike is @pleasestandbyphotography on instagram.

If you want 52 Things to start on right now to improve your filmmaking and photography – we have videos on them all here:

Our GEAR ————
Main DSLR :
Second Camera :
Main Lens –
The Adventure Camera Bag :
The Macro Lens –
Telephoto Lens –
Our Mega Wide Lens –
Our BEST On-camera Mic –
The Drone –
My Moving Timelapse setup –
GoPro HERO 7 –
Our Filmmaking Book!!! –
Our Music:
The full video setup:
(By buying through these links you help us support the channel)

On Social ————–
Instagram: (Jonas @behindthescience)
Twitter:
Facebook:
Website:
YouTube: (for most of my work)

Jonas and I are creating a whole series of how-to-filmmaking videos to get you started. Here is the first video: and our book:

My main science YouTube Channel:

Help us create amazing, world reaching content by translating and transcribing videos on our channel: